“OVERFLOW” at the Getty

Overflow took place at the Getty Center on April 26th and 27th, 2008. The schedule was as follows:

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Saturday, Building of the Classic Kaprow Structure: 10am – 5pm, followed by Cocktail Party, 6:00pm-8pm

Sunday, Deconstrcution and Repurposing Activities and Performances: 10am – 4pm

Links:

Getty:

http://www.getty.edu/visit/events/overflow.html

NY Times:

http://www.nytimes.com/2008/04/13/arts/design/13fink.html?_r=1&pagewanted=2&ei=5070&en=b58482f6828a7d03&ex=1208750400&emc=eta1&oref=slogin

Moca:

http://www.moca.org/kaprow/index.php/category/fluids/

Participating artists include:

 

Tricia Avant

Stephanie Allespach

Allison Danielle Behrstock

Krista Chael

Sydney Croskery

Jackie Dunbar

Karen Dunbar

Angela Ellsworth

Phyllis Green

Micol Hebron

Parichard Holm

Leigh McCarthy

Marjam Oskoui

Nancy Popp

Sarah Riley

Felis Stella

Ten Terrell

Marjan Vayghan

 

Overflow: A Reinvention of Allan Kaprow’s Fluids

 

Date: Saturday and Sunday, April 26 and 27, 2008
Time: 10:00–8:30 p.m. on Saturday, 10:00–4:00 p.m. on Sunday
Location: Getty Center
Admission: Free; no reservations required.

“During two days, a rectangular structure of ice blocks (measuring about 30 feet long, 10 wide and 8 high) will be built at the Getty Center. The walls will be broken, dismantled and repurposed. The remains of these activities will be left to melt.”

—LA Art Girls

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LA Art Girls Photo: Stephanie Allespach, 2008

Fluids, one of renowned artist Allan Kaprow’s most ambitious Happenings, was realized in 1967 when teams of volunteers built rectangular ice structures throughout the Los Angeles area. Overflow by the LA Art Girls is a reinvention of Fluids that seeks to reinterpret the original score. It is conceived as both a historical dedication and a contemporary investigation of some of the issues raised by Kaprow’s original piece.

This event was broadcasted live via webcam on April 25 and 26, 2008.

Schedule

Saturday, April 26, 10:00 a.m.–8:30 p.m.
LA Art Girls and The Union Ice Company build a rectangular ice structure at the Getty Center’s Lower Terrace Sculpture Garden, followed by a celebration with DJ J. Sole of KCRW starting at 6:00 p.m.

Sunday, April 27, 10:00 a.m.–4:00 p.m.
LA Art Girls and volunteers dismantle the ice structure, removing and repurposing the ice to various locations around the Getty campus.

Fluids at the Los Angeles County Museum of Art
The reinvention of Fluids commences on Friday, April 25, at 9:00 a.m. with the building of ice structures at the Los Angeles County Museum of Art (LACMA) and various sites around the city. See Fluids: A Happening by Allan Kaprow on LACMA’s Web site for more details.

About the LA Art Girls
The LA Art Girls, an art group with over 30 members, strives to be a voluntary and nonhierarchical gathering of practices and a source

overflow_fluids_detail

Detail of a poster for Fluids (with score), Allan Kaprow, 1967. Research Library, The Getty Research Institute. Allan Kaprow papers (980063)

of mutual inspiration, support, and dialogue. The LA Art Girls have produced several collaborative projects, including Total Art Performance Event, a series of Fluxus-inspired performances held the Getty Center in June 2006 as part of the conference Movement and the Visual Arts. For more information on the LA Art Girls please visit their Web site, www.laartgirls.com.The LA Art Girls involved in Overflow are:
Stephanie Allespach, Tricia Avant, Allison Danielle Behrstock, Krista Chael, Sydney Croskery, Jackie Dunbar, Karen Dunbar, Angela Ellsworth, Phyllis Green, Micol Hebron, Parichard Holm, Leigh McCarthy, Marjam Oskoui, Nancy Popp, Sarah Riley, Felis Stella, Ten Terrell, Marjan K. VayghanAbout This Project
The Union Ice Company has provided generous in-kind support for the project.This event is a collaboration between the Getty Research Institute (GRI), The J. Paul Getty Museum, The Museum of Contemporary Art, Los Angeles (MOCA), and the Los Angeles County Museum of Art (LACMA). The program is held in conjunction with MOCA’s Kaprow retrospective, Allan Kaprow: Art as Life, the J. Paul Getty Museum’s California Video exhibition, and the GRI’s publication Allan Kaprow—Art as Life (2008).

http://www.nytimes.com/2008/04/13/arts/design/13fink.html?pagewanted=2&ei=5070&en=b58482f6828a7d03&ex=1208750400&emc=eta1

Published: April 13, 2008

Happenings Are Happening Again

One of those artists, Barbara T. Smith, created a new version of Kaprow’s popular “Push and Pull: A Furniture Comedy for Hans Hofmann” from 1963 by setting up a living room’s worth of furniture, from chairs to tables to bookcases, all painted blue. Visitors can move the furniture, creating blue scuff marks on the floor.

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Kaprow’s 1967 “Fluids” is being restaged as part of the show.

At the center of the exhibition is another interactive piece, created by Ms. Lacy, the architect Michael Rotondi and the media producer Peter Kirby. Wooden chairs form a circle on a large pad of dirt, with a phone booth in one corner and the Kaprow video of “Trading Dirt” in another. Every Saturday Kaprow’s friends are scheduled to come, sit and record their experiences with his work for an audio archive.

At other times, anyone can enter the booth and dial (213) 455-2926 to record personal memories of Kaprow. (You can also call in from home.) Called “Trade Talk,” in a nod to “Trading Dirt,” this work is more tribute than re-creation. When the space is active, Mr. Kaiser describes it as “a living archive”; when it’s not, he regards it as a symbolic “void” at the center of the museum.

As Ms. Lacy sees it: “The conundrum of Allan’s work is how to move it into the museum, which was so fraught for him. I wanted to capture the part of Allan’s work that was the most significant to him and the most ephemeral. And that is the experience of his work as it becomes part of, and lives on in, someone else’s memory.”

The museum’s education department has organized a full program of Kaprow “reinventions” at sites ranging from local art schools to places overseen by community centers, like Watts Towers. With financing from the Getty Foundation, the museum has lined up 29 different institutions as partners in organizing 32 events (or nonevents) through June. Details are posted at moca.org/kaprow.

On Tuesday, for example, a group of University of Southern California students will reinvent “Drag” from 1984 by dragging concrete blocks around campus. Following Kaprow’s score, when you meet someone you know, you must switch to carrying the block. The next time you meet someone you know, you switch to pushing it. And then back to dragging, and so on.

On Wednesday the Hammer Museum will enact “Museum Portraits,” an unrealized activity that Kaprow developed for the Hamburger Kunsthalle in 1977. He proposed that museum employees move their desk chairs to the street for an hour, exposing the “backstage” of the museum and perhaps revealing the way a chair can serve as a portrait of the sitter. “Van Gogh understood this very well,” he wrote, “when he painted ‘portraits’ of himself and Gauguin by depicting their respective chairs: one, crude, the other, elegant.”

Some of Kaprow’s most famous pieces will also be reconceived. Starting on April 22, Los Angeles Contemporary Exhibitions will present his breakthrough 1959 “18 Happenings in 6 Parts.” And several institutions — including the Museum of Contemporary Art, the Los Angeles County Museum of Art and the Getty Center — will be recreating Kaprow’s 1967 work “Fluids,” starting on April 25. Each will build a large roomlike structure out of 50-pound bricks of ice and then let it melt.

“Kaprow had such a huge impact on Los Angeles, and ties to so many institutions here,” said Aandrea Stang, the Museum of Contemporary Art’s education program manager. “It was exciting to see how many groups wanted to be involved.”

Although he began his career and his Happenings in New York, Mr. Kaprow’s first retrospective was in 1967 at the Pasadena Art Museum, which helped organize a multisite production of “Fluids” across the greater Los Angeles area. Two years later he joined the faculty at the California Institute of the Arts before becoming a mainstay at the University of California, San Diego.

He taught at CalArts at the same time as the conceptual artist John Baldessari, which inspired the one-liner that while all of Mr. Baldessari’s students went on to become art stars, Kaprow’s went on to become social workers. “Or Zen Buddhists or chiropractors,” said Ms. Lacy, who shared a Zen teacher with Kaprow.

Kaprow was also close to the artist Paul McCarthy, who is doing his own, more private performances at unannounced times. The museum says he is planning a version of “Spit” from 1985, using a Q-tip and his own saliva to clean the car owned by Jeremy Strick, the museum’s director. (Saliva was a favorite medium of Kaprow, who had students lick their arms and watch the saliva dry and put ice to great use.)

For Ms. Lacy much of Kaprow’s work has social or political potential, even if he personally avoided that kind of content. Not only does his work bring people together, but it also uses the stuff of real life. There’s just one step, she said, from a Kaprow activity that involves brushing your teeth to a feminist performance that includes ironing clothes.

“That’s one reason the Watts film is so interesting,” Ms. Lacy said of Ms. Hooks’s project. “They seem to be using Allan’s work as a vehicle for political reasons.”

“You could look at their film and say it’s nothing Allan would have done himself, but I think he would have talked about it and thought about it. I don’t think he would have judged it.”

As for Ms. Hooks, she said she found some of her exchanges of dirt fascinating, even at the material level. The dirt offered by the sculptor Kenzi Shiokava was really rich, she said, complete with insects. “And we got some really wonderful conversation and stories, comedy and history.”

“This kind of work requires a lot of trust,” she said. “People could have been suspicious: What are you talking about, trading a bucket of dirt? But they were all so open.”

She plans to finish the film next month in the hopes that the museum will screen it before the end of its show. In the meantime she’s keeping the bucket of dirt.

“I’m going to ride the bucket around in my car until we finish shooting,” she said. “We still have to get some B-roll and wraparound stuff.”

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OVERFLOW 2008

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Overflow: A Reinvention of Allan Kaprow’s Fluids

Date: Saturday and Sunday, April 26 and 27, 2008
Time: 10:00–8:30 p.m. on Saturday, 10:00–4:00 p.m. on Sunday
Location: Getty Center
Admission: Free; no reservations required.

“During two days, a rectangular structure of ice blocks (measuring about 30 feet long, 10 wide and 8 high) will be built at the Getty Center. The walls will be broken, dismantled and repurposed. The remains of these activities will be left to melt.”
—LA Art Girls

LA Art Girls

Fluids, one of renowned artist Allan Kaprow’s most ambitious Happenings, was realized in 1967 when teams of volunteers built rectangular ice structures throughout the Los Angeles area. Overflow by the LA Art Girls is a reinvention of Fluidsthat seeks to reinterpret the original score. It is conceived as both a historical dedication and a contemporary investigation of some of the issues raised by Kaprow’s original piece.

This event was broadcasted live via webcam on April 25 and 26, 2008.

Schedule

Saturday, April 26, 10:00 a.m.–8:30 p.m.
LA Art Girls and The Union Ice Company build a rectangular ice structure at the Getty Center’s Lower Terrace Sculpture Garden, followed by a celebration with DJ J. Sole of KCRW starting at 6:00 p.m.

Sunday, April 27, 10:00 a.m.–4:00 p.m.
LA Art Girls and volunteers dismantle the ice structure, removing and repurposing the ice to various locations around the Getty campus.

Fluids at the Los Angeles County Museum of Art
The reinvention of Fluids commences on Friday, April 25, at 9:00 a.m. with the building of ice structures at the Los Angeles County Museum of Art (LACMA) and various sites around the city. See Fluids: A Happening by Allan Kaprow on LACMA’s Web site for more details.

About the LA Art Girls
The LA Art Girls, an art group with over 30 members, strives to be a voluntary and nonhierarchical gathering of practices and a source


Allan Kaprow, Detail of a poster for Fluids (with score)

of mutual inspiration, support, and dialogue. The LA Art Girls have produced several collaborative projects, including Total Art Performance Event, a series of Fluxus-inspired performances held the Getty Center in June 2006 as part of the conference Movement and the Visual Arts. For more information on the LA Art Girls please visit their Web site, www.laartgirls.com.

The LA Art Girls involved in Overflow are:
Stephanie Allespach, Tricia Avant, Allison Danielle Behrstock, Krista Chael, Sydney Croskery, Jackie Dunbar, Karen Dunbar, Angela Ellsworth, Phyllis Green, Micol Hebron, Parichard Holm, Leigh McCarthy, Marjam Oskoui, Nancy Popp, Sarah Riley, Felis Stella, Ten Terrell, Marjan K. Vayghan

About This Project
The Union Ice Company has provided generous in-kind support for the project.

This event is a collaboration between the Getty Research Institute (GRI), The J. Paul Getty Museum, The Museum of Contemporary Art, Los Angeles (MOCA), and the Los Angeles County Museum of Art (LACMA). The program is held in conjunction with MOCA’s Kaprow retrospective, Allan Kaprow: Art as Life, the J. Paul Getty Museum’s California Video exhibition, and the GRI’s publication Allan Kaprow—Art as Life (2008).

How to Get Here
The Getty Center is located at 1200 Getty Center Drive in Los Angeles, California, approximately 12 miles northwest of downtown Los Angeles. See Hours, Directions, Parking for maps and driving directions.


LA Art Girls: Overflow

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