Press

 Fabric Magazine, “Leaving the Land of Roses,” by Peter Frank:
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Ubiktwst Magazine, “Escape,” Issue 2, New York
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FINEARTTREKKINSANTAMONICA

 

 

FRIDAY, MARCH 4, 2011

Marjan Vayghan in Art Exhibition “HAVE YOU SEEN MY PRIVACY?” Curated by Richard Newton Opened at 18th STREET ARTS CENTER in Santa Monica, California February 19, 2011. PhotoJournal by Ginger Van Hook

 

 

Artist Marjan Vayghan celebrates the opening of her latest exhibition in Santa Monica

by giving spiritual readings inside of the crates that used to belong to Bill Viola.

Photo by Ginger Van Hook©2011

A multi-media artist who is a fellow graduate of Otis College of Art and Design in Los Angeles as well as a Scholar at UCLA (The University of California Los Angeles), Ms. Marjan Vayghan took the time to give me a interview for FINE ART TREKKIN’ SANTA MONICA from inside of the crates that used to belong to Bill Viola! Born in Iran and raised in Los Angeles, Marjan Vayghan exists as an artist with dual citizenship, dual friendships and dual commitments to artists, democracy, political freedoms, feminists issues and human rights, not to mention community gardens and Building Bridges between countries. Marjan’s website http://www.marjanvayghan.com is a potpourri of artistically blended projects that seek to build bridges between the cultures of the East and the West. Her show was curated by Richard Newton who also displayed some of his work and is part of a larger scheme of projects called the “LEGACY EXHIBITIONS” funded by the J.Paul Getty Museum and hosted by the 18th STREET ARTS CENTER located at 1639 18th Street in Santa Monica, California. 90404.

 

I’ve not met anyone with as much determination to bring happiness to dueling cultural practices and experiences as Marjan Vayghan. Marjan has a determination to succeed despite any misunderstandings the two worlds may have had in the past or any entanglements they may have presently. I enjoy the work Marjan does, not only because it is insightful, but because her spirit is joyful, her attitude is uplifting and her determination is unyeilding. Do check out the exhibition which runs through March and then she also has a solo show that will run through June…which will be announced here through Fine Art Trekkin’!

 

 

 

Editor and Publisher,

ArchitectsAndArtisans.com

Turning a Kidnapping Into Art

Posted: 05/19/11 10:45 AM ET

 

 

Marjan Vayghan is a 26-year-old performance artist who’s turned a harrowing detention by Iranian police into a cathartic work of experiential art.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

On August 5, 2009, during the Green Revolution, she was with a friend, driving toward a gallery in Tehran, when they pulled onto a street populated entirely by police on foot, in vans and in buses. She grabbed her camera and started to shoot.

“A man started yelling at us — he was foaming at the mouth,” she said. “The door opened and I got pulled out. And it just got worse after that.”

She was arrested, blindfolded, hooded and interrogated into the early hours of August 6th. Then she was released.

On August 7, she attended the funeral of a childhood friend. The voids of open graves yawned across the cemetery as far as she could see.

An Iranian native raised in the states, she returned to Los Angeles. She carried with her a tote bag filled with dirt from the grave of Neda Agha-Soltan — a young woman shot through the chest during election protests on June 20 — and green revolutionary armbands found at the cemetery.

They would become her pigments, with which she’d work in a series of modular, mobile performance spaces.

Before that process could begin, though, she sat in her closet — for two years.

The graduate of Otis College of Art and Design, with a master’s degree from UCLA, eventually emerged to create four shipping crates with painted, interchangeable side panels of canvas, illuminated from within. Audio tracks stripped from actual video shot during the revolution provide a sound track of sirens and screams. One crate contains the dirt from Neda’s grave and another, the green revolutionary armbands. They’re all filled with stories collected while the artist was in Iran.

 

 

 

 

 

 

“You can participate and play with them any way you like,” she said. “I like to sit inside one of the crates and invite people to come in. It’s my way of kidnapping them. When they leave, they’re happier, not traumatized. Every single person has left happier.”

She only invites visitors in if they ask. And she’ll give them her paintings and poems about the things they’ve discussed, but only upon request.

 

 

 

 

 

 

“Fear, violence and trauma operate on a circular pattern,” she said. “It’s a pattern that I have only been able to mediate through helping others in a creative, healing ritual.”

Her work on each crate is a metaphor for how some governments betray their people. “When you open it up, the structure falls apart, because you can hear the people suffering,” she said. “The government has gotten good at creating structures with mass genocide within them.

Her next project, she said, will be a giant lotus.

Affaire in the Gardens Art Show in Beverly Hills has organized a night of collaboration and conversation with Vayghan on Saturday, May 21st, at 8 PM.

For more information, click here. For more by J. Michael Welton, click here.

 

 

Follow J. Michael Welton on Twitter: www.twitter.com/@mikewelton

 

 

http://www.kcet.org/arts/artbound/counties/los-angeles/marjan-k-vayghan-legacy-crates-shulamit-gallery.html

 

January 22, 2013

Fleeing the Rose Garden: Marjan K. Vayghan Creates Safe Spaces in Los Angeles

Meher McArthur

Asian Accents: This article is part of an ongoing series that explores the diverse range of artistic influences from Asia in the arts and culture of Southern California.

It is a cool, crisp day in Venice. With my boots still on, I climb carefully inside the wooden crate, bow down my head to avoid hitting it on the “ceiling” of the crate – a photograph on stretched vinyl of the intricate tile work on the ceiling of a Persian mosque. I wriggle into a comfortable position on the well-worn Persian carpet and cushions scattered inside and become part of “Break the Lass and Fall into the Glassblower’s Breath,” a mixed-media, modular performance piece currently on view at Shulamit Gallery in Venice.

The title of the work puns a line from a poem by 13th-century Sufi mystic and poet Rumi: “Break the glass and fall into the glassblower’s breath,” words that encourage us to let go and accepting our life, our fate. The “lass” here is Marjan K. Vayghan, an exuberant emerging artist of Azerbaijani-Iranian background who has lived between Iran and the United States since her family moved here in 1995. Not yet thirty, Vayghan is passionate about her homeland, its art, literature, architecture, food and people, but is far from accepting the horrors many Iranians have experienced in recent years — abuse against women and non-Muslim residents, kidnappings, and murder. Her series of transformed art shipping crates, her “Legacy Crates,” not only symbolize her journey from the land of her ancestry and her transcultural life and identity, but more significantly, they provide a safe place in which she can retreat from these horrors and nourish her soul on the art, poetry and dreams of the Iran she loves.

An installation view of several Legacy Crates from “Break the Lass and Fall into the Glassblower’s Breath” by Marjan K. Vayghan, 2012. | Photo: Marjan K. Vayghan.
Vayghan has experienced these horrors first hand. Since her family moved to the US, they have returned every summer to Iran. In recent years, Vayghan had been using her trips back to Tehran to explore her creativity, work with artists there and curate exhibitions that introduced foreign artists’ works to Iranians. On August 5, 2009, she was driving to an art gallery in Tehran with her partner when suddenly a man outside the car started yelling at them. He pulled her out of the car and took her away for interrogation. She was interrogated at length by strangers, who undoubtedly worked for the government. Her eyes well up as she describes how, after several rounds of interrogation, verbal abuse and separation from her loved ones, she almost longed for death to come. “I just wanted to see a loved one’s eyes one more time before I died.” She was released early the next morning, and though she was never actually accused of a specific crime, she fears what might happen to her if she were to return to Iran. Just two days after her kidnapping, she attended the funeral of a childhood friend who was murdered.

The artist performing inside a Legacy Crate from the “Break the Lass and Fall into the Glassblower’s Breath” series, by Marjan K. Vayghan, kinetic, audio and light installation, 2012. | Courtesy of Shulamit Gallery, Venice.
Vayghan was profoundly traumatized. After returning to the US, she spent two years hiding inside her closet reading and “geeking out” learning about art theory and poetry. She filled her closet with Persian carpets and cushions, creating a safe, womb-like place of beauty and art to help her heal. Making art also helped her numb the pain. When a local artist gave her several shipping crates he no longer needed, she realized that she could use them to create similar safe places to share with others. “The Breaking the Lass series,” she explains, “is about turning fear and anxiety into a therapeutic, creative means of expression.” She invites participation. “Sometimes I kidnap people,” she explains. “After they have spent time in the crate, they come out feeling happier, not traumatized. I wish I could send a crate to everyone.”

A Legacy Crate from “Break the Lass and Fall into the Glassblower’s Breath” series by Marjan K. Vayghan, kinetic, audio and light installation, 2013, outside Shulamit Gallery, Venice Beach. | Photo: Meher McArthur.
Beyond therapy, she hopes that the crates will remind people here that, despite the lack of news coverage here since the Green Revolution of 2009, many people in Iran are still suffering at the hands of an abusive regime. Visitors who sit inside will hear audio recordings of people shouting at a gravesite protest in Tehran, as well as people whispering that it is inappropriate for young lady to dry in public. For those visitors she “kidnaps,” she is more than willing to share with them her own experiences, political views, and even her prints and poetry if they ask. This intimate engagement with others is the heart of her performance.

“Marjan uses her art to speak in a generational voice about Iran,” says Shulamit Gallery owner and co-director Shulamit Nazarian. “She is the youngest artist we are featuring right now, but she is a pivotal artist — she knows both worlds, Iran and the US, so she fits into our gallery’s mission, to create a bridge between cultures.” In the exhibition “Leaving the Land of Roses” at Shulamit Gallery, Vayghan’s crates themselves share a safe space with the works of more seasoned Iranian artists — David Abir, Krista Nassi and Tal Shochat — all of whom left Iran behind to create a new home (Abir and Nassi in the US and Shochat in Israel). Their works all explore ideas of exile and the nostalgic longing for a fragrant, beautiful homeland. “Vayghan’s artworks are highly political,” explains Nazarian, “but they are powerful because they express a childlike longing for a homeland of her imagination.”

Three summers have passed since Vayghan’s kidnapping, and she has spent them all in Los Angeles. She longs to go back to her “home” in Iran, especially now because her grandmother, one of the three women who raised her, is very ill. However, Los Angeles has now become her “safe place,” and for the time being, her Legacy Crates and the powerful human interactions they invite will sooth and heal her spirit until she is ready and able to return again to the land of roses.

Meher McArthur with Marjan K. Vayghan inside a Legacy Crate from “Break the Lass and Fall into the Glassblower’s Breath” series by Marjan K. Vayghan, kinetic and audio sculpture, 2013 | Courtesy of Shulamit Gallery, Venice Beach.
Marjan K. Vayghan’s work is on view at Shulamit Gallery in Venice as part of the exhibition “Leaving the Land of Roses,” which is open to the public from January 19 through March 9, 2013. The exhibition is a satellite exhibition of the exhibition “Light and Shadows: The Story of Iranian Jews” at the UCLA Fowler Museum through March 10, 2013.
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Top Image: Detail of a Legacy Crate from the “Break the Lass and Fall into the Glassblower’s Breath” series by Marjan K. Vayghan, kinetic, audio and light installation, 2013 | Courtesy of Shulamit Gallery, Venice.

 

 

 

 

 

http://blogs.laweekly.com/stylecouncil/2011/12/moca_gala_controversy.php

 

Performance Art

Marina Abramovic’s MOCA Gala Controversy: Jeffrey Deitch Confronted and the Performers Speak Out

 

By Catherine Wagley Mon., Dec. 19 2011 at 12:30 PM

Categories: ArtMuseumsPerformance Art

Getty Images for MOCA

A human centerpiece at the “Artist Life Manifesto” directed by Marina Abramovic for the MOCA Gala

 

The guests at MOCA’s annual galas are patrons high in the economic hierarchy: politicians, heirs, celebrities, moguls, entrepreneurs who’ve made bank. Tickets cost an arm and a leg — they ranged from $2,500 to $10,000 at this year’s gala on Nov. 12 — and the draw is always that some particularly famous artist “directs” the event, a deal made sweeter by the appearance of a token celebrity or two. Two years ago, Italian artist Francesco Vezzoli directed and Lady Gaga performed “Speechless,” but this year, the token celebrity, Debbie Harry, was less tantalizing to many in L.A.’s arts community than the director: Marina Abramovic.

The New York-based Serbian artist just closed her Museum of Modern Art retrospective, “The Artist is Present,” where she appeared in person, sitting for hours in a long red dress and locking eyes with visitors who endured winding lines to sit across from her. For her gala performance, she planned again to subject guests to unnerving intimacy and she needed help to do so.

At her gala, most of the table centerpieces would be rotating human heads that would lock eyes with guests as they circled. Naked bodies positioned beneath life-sized skeletons would rotate around six additional tables, and a chorus of volunteers would also be needed to dress the guests in white lab coats and shout out Abramovic’s artist’s manifesto at the appropriate time. She held auditions that attracted a number of admiring artists, dancers and actors. Prospective performers were warned that gala guests could try to poke or feed them, they would be expected to sign a non-disclosure agreement, and would be paid with $150 and a year-long MOCA membership. That was just the beginning of the controversy, which was hashed out and argued over at a reflective public forum on Saturday.

Dancer Sara Wookey, who participated in the November 7 auditions, wrote to her mentor Yvonne Rainer, a filmmaker, choreographer and dancer who studied with Martha Graham and Merce Cunningham before breaking out to pursue a freer version of dance that celebrated the “everyday body.” Rainer composed a letterto MOCA’s director, Jeffrey Deitch, expressing her frustration about poor compensation and potential exploitation of artists. She forwarded the letter to a few friends for their feedback and a snowball effect ensued. Soon, the letter had been “leaked” online. Bloggers responded, the L.A. Timesweighed in and Deitch invited Rainer to attend the auditions to see for herself.

 

 

Saturday’s public forum on the MOCA gala

“Yvonne Rainer’s letter was a performative act,” said theorist, professor and sometimes-performer Matias Viegener on Saturday, at the start of the public forum, which dealt with Abramovic’s gala, Rainer’s response and the potential implications. Viegener co-organized the forum, held at Los Angeles Contemporary Exhibition (LACE), with cultural critic Jennifer Doyle and artist-curator Dino Dinco. By “performative act,” Viegener meant that Rainer wasn’t merely criticizing. By taking a stance, she was participating, or intervening, in Abramovic’s performance and he hoped that the forum could function similarly.

 

The strange thing about the MOCA Gala controversy is that the majority of the people talking about it weren’t there, a fact that is itself controversial. For the most part, the approximately 750 guests haven’t spoken up, and opinions of actual performers, who were not named in the gala program, have been overshadowed by Rainer’s letter. The forum started by attempting to remedy that. Around a dozen gala participants who were there described their experiences.

Artist Marjan Vayghan helped guests into white lab coats as they arrived (Abramovic requested all guests wear them) and recalled that some reacted viscerally to the prospect of covering themselves up. Artist Honey McMoney, who also helped with the lab coats, noted it became increasingly difficult to tell guests apart from the waiters, volunteers and performers. “The nature of the power structure started to crumble in a really delightful way,” he said.

Carrie McILwain, an artist who co-runs the alt space Raid Projects, performed as a turning head and found her presence made some guests visibly uncomfortable. “One woman, I felt like she couldn’t eat in front of me,” said McILwain.

Artist Blaine O’Neill also performed as a head, and spent the night rotating around a table that included Eli Broad, Mayor Villarogosa, and a number of collectors. “The only person who gave me more than five minutes [of eye-contact] was the mayor,” said O’Neill. “But that was a pretty fun experience — to stare down the mayor.”

The way they described it, the performers had more power than guests did in their roles at the gala. But that didn’t mean they weren’t exploited.

Artist Adam Vuiitton also attended the gala, but as a protester, not a performer, and he brought with him a sign showing a guillotine. Since performing artists appeared “beheaded on the tables of the ultra-rich,” it seemed a relevant metaphor. Another of the protesters with him had decided, at one point, to break in to the gala, dodged past security and made it far enough to yell to the guests that, one day, their heads would be on the tables. Guards escorted her out, but took no further measures. Then, said Vuiitton, the protesters went out for a beer and talked about starting an artists’ union.

That issue — wages and economics — became a major one as the forum continued. Artists work for free and for less than $150 all the time, either for the experience or the principle, but does that make it excusable? And what does it mean that artists were the engine driving an event they could not afford to attend? Certainly, rarefied events generate important revenue for a place like MOCA. But they still alienate, as Doyle, the critic, noted. “Someone like me begins to feel already always unwelcome” in the space of the museum, she said.

Something else had been unwelcome at the museum, too. Abramovic initially wanted both male and female bodies to circle around those on those six special tables, but only women appeared. When MOCA director Jeffrey Deitch slipped in near the end of the forum, someone posed the question to him: why no naked men? “That was my request to Marina Abramovic,” said Deitch, citing the discomfort the conventional businessman feels when confronted with male nudity. “We subjected people to a lot of things,” he continued, but said when you push something out to the edge you have to be careful not to go over.

Marjan Vayghan reacted, and her words, which closed the forum, reflected the conflictedness that had coursed through the whole discussion. She thanked Deitch for even attending, acknowledged how difficult his job must be and that she had found her participation in Abramovic’s performance powerful. But why was it the female body that was still always subject to display? Why were we stuck in these old molds of acceptability and unacceptability? And was it really true that the guests, who had democratized by donning the lab coats, couldn’t have pushed themselves just a little bit further and accepted another kind of democratization, too?

from THE SILENT SUBALTERNS <-> to PERFORMING HYBRIDITY

 

 

PERFORMING HYBRIDITY:

THE IN-BETWEEN ART OF MARJAN K. VAYGHAN

 

 

The tragic irony of the Twenty-First Century is that, although we live in a global society, the reaction to transnationalism has been a renewed emphasis on difference, with cultures closing in protectively and walling themselves off against anything Other.  Artists of the late Twentieth Century, such as Mona Hartoum and Shirin Neshat, based their art production on their cultural roles as women within an Arab society, asserting difference and conflating it with cultural distinction.  But younger artists, such as Marjan Vayghan reject this outmoded Modernist polarization between East and West, between Orient and Occident, between male and female.  “I have spent my life resisting reductive labels imposed on me (Iranian, American, female, biracial, Other), yet they nevertheless…define how the world sees me.”  She is a hybrid product of multiple cultures, double-coding her Iranian/American lives, and this inescapable hybridity defies the hierarchies inherent in opposites.

 

 

{Vayghan’s hybridity of equality is illustrated in one of her earlier works, “Permutations of Three” in which grass grows improbably on nine concrete blocks, leaching water out of the solid cement.  Hybridity is everywhere in this open air installation: nature and culture coming together to nourish each other in terms of the number three—a hybrid number par excellence that cannot be divided into halves.}

 

Part of a Post-Theory generation, Vayghan works the in-between spaces of art and culture, somewhere between one and three but not two, because two can be divided.  Her work is luminal, always hovering on the edge of alterity and always resisting Otherness, refusing to cross that threshold.  Her luminal operations are to be experienced by the viewer, for her installations demand more than mere sight.  Haft Seen recreates the artist’s concern over the (im) balance between nature and culture.  A cold inhospitable tile floor becomes a water site for fragile fish by an act of subtraction—the removal of some of the tiles.  The space opened is not soft, as the Other to hard, but is a betweenness, a both/and—living water hosting vulnerable beings, existing at the mercies of the spectators.  Composed of seven elements, another indivisible number, Haft Seen, like Three, is a hybrid work of art, a Postminimalist sculpture that depends upon the performative presences of the artist and her collaborators and the audience.

 

A post-post modern artist, Marjan Vayghan is a performance artist, an installation artist, a writer, and a go-between, using her art-making strategies, not to divide, but to demonstrate that difference should not mandate separateness.  Vayghan’s engagement with the traditional fine arts is one of repatriation, restoring to art its original purpose—to reach out to the audience, with the hope of bringing people together.  The power and subtlety of her work is the intersection between the artist’s intention, the collaborators who may or may not know that they are part of a performance, and the humanistic and ecumenical statements that unfold with a spontaneous naturalness embedded within that most artificial of actions: art.  Her most recent work, Watchtower Study, based in Iran, breaks the barrier between the surveyor and the surveyed and interrogates the Panoptican.  In Iran, watchtowers are placed at social intersections and presided over by otherwise unemployed young men who stand hour after hour, observing their fellow citizens.  For a few months they can go from being watched to being the watcher.  A watchtower is a structure of duality: a tower can watch over you, take care of you, protect you from harm; a tower can also watch you.  Pregnant with its own antithesis, the tower is a yet another luminal object, always on the threshold of becoming something else.  Deconstructing the apparent duality of surveillance, Vayghan does something very simple: she talks to the young men about their role in the towers.  The encounter, the performance, the appropriated installation (the watchtowers) metamorphizes into hybridity, as she unveils the absurdity of oppression: for oppression to operate, it must be mindless.  None of the watchers understood why they were watching or what they were watching for.  The watchers do not see.  The artist leaves the men in place, as she left her prayer rugs in her Imam Zadeh Saleh mosque project, abandoning to the future what she calls “a comfort zone, a meeting ground, an interstitial space,” created out of the ritual of interactions between herself and others.  Perhaps the minds of the young men she spoke with were moved, like her prayer rugs, but she will never know.

 

 

The nature of the luminal is that it always hovers just below the surface of consciousness, in that in-between space of possibility.  The nature of hybridity is that it can never be resolved or rescued from its manifest complexity.  The paradox of performance is that it must end and not generate an object and should never cease to exist in the memory where it is endlessly reconstituted.  Like Joseph Beuys, Marjan Vayghan practices “social sculpture,” or what Beuys called an “expanded concept of art.”  Beuys gave up the outmoded practices of art-making for an anthropological notion of art, saying, “To hell with creation—man is the creator himself!”  In her performances, which reenact her cultural hybridity, Vayghan seems to echo the ideas of the late artist and appears to revive his notion of art as a healing process.  As Beuys said in 1969,

 

It’s important to expand, to get away from the unusable concept of formal creativity.  It’s creative when a person occupies himself with anatomy or with geography…the person takes on a sculptural quality himself: he gets interested and he’ll see that forms have context, that they have responsibility.  You can’t just tell a person to do something  “creative.”  You have to think about expanded connections.

 

It is crucially important that the viewer does not fall into the identity trap and reduces this artist to the sum of her differences—a woman from a Muslim nation.  Working after Spivak and after Said, Vayghan is sensitive to the weakness of postcolonial theory and deconstructs postcoloniality with her art-making practices.  Said himself was aware of how outmoded his early work had become.  Writing about emerging feminism in 1993, the late scholar could have been referring to Vayghan.

 

Such works are feminist, but not exclusivist; they demonstrate the diversity and complexity of experience that works beneath the totalizing discourse of Orientalism and of Middle East (overwhelmingly male) nationalism, they are both intellectually and politically sophisticated, attuned to the best theoretical and historical scholarship, engaged but not demagogic, sensitive to but not maudlin about, women’s experience…

 

But we are in now in a new century and Marjan Vayghan is an artist who is post everything.  Rather than being belated, she is at the beginning of what will be the hybrid future of us all in a global society.  Like many of her generation, she is not so much a feminist as an artist who lives out feminism as a humanist.  Her art is not about her; it is about all of us and for all of those who  accept contradictions and celebrate the newly composite nature of transnational life as we now know it.  The artist is homeless, yet has many homes, and acts out her internal sense of home with her performances, which make a place for her wherever she goes.  “I am split.  I am whole,”  she says and makes art somewhere in between.

 

 

Essay by Dr. Jeanne S. M. Willette

Art Historian and Art Critic in Los Angeles

http://community.ovationtv.com/_Marjan-Vayghan/photo/3295116/16878.html

 

Marjan Vayghan

Uploaded By: trimblecarbon

3 years ago

Level: Artist

Points: 12605

Description:

 

Performance/conceptual artist Marjan Vayghan at Gallery825’s GEM exhibit on Saturday (4/11).   This installation, entitled “Prayer Rug”, was originally performed on-site at the Imam Zadeh Saleh (امامزاده صالح) shrine in Iran.  Marjan explores the concepts of interaction, servitude, collaboration, reverence, participation, and fulfillment through her creation and viewer consumption of a traditional Persian meal, which consists of freshly baked flat-bread, fresh herbs, feta cheese, whole dates, etc.

Tags: conceptual installation laaa marjan performance photography vayghan

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  1. I love this. reminds me of a dream. Captured perfectlyjanemarie, 3 years ago | Flag

  2. Just love this shot.
  3. •Edward.
  4. •NYC1NYC_artist, 3 years ago | Flag

  5. agreed with joepro. It has a since of bittersweet feel to it. Nicely done. 5 Stars.Btheartist, 3 years ago | Flag

  6. Wow what a haunting image, beautiful!joepro69, 3 years ago | Flag

  7. How cool is THIS !!! The hues are beautiful! Image too. How did you create the ‘effects’ of movement in there…can see the prayer rug..and surreal feel– Klasse!! In description you mention freshly baked flatbread ..sooo good!!herbs and feta cheese..delish!! Best.Luise.
  8. •Like this photograph!! Luise.laselectart, 3 years ago | Flag

  9. I love the colors you used. Very homey.achyhart, 3 years ago | Flag

  10. •Intriguing image!  Well done!diver5115, 3 years ago | Flag

  11. reminds me of a girl sitting on a throne of pillows. has a very 70’s feel to it.dharmaflame, 3 years ago | Flag

  12. doood, you fool my eyes with your crazy camera tricks! bravo and 7.2 stars and a bottle of lotion.funkyiron, 3 years ago | Flag

  13. Excellent example of a good way to imply movement. Fantastic!
  14. •                   StuartStuart, 3 years ago | Flag 

My Heart Is in the East, and I Am at the Ends of the West

 

Home: True Stories from LA’s Muslims and Jews
Sunday, December 2, 2012 | 7-9:00 p.m.

Busby’s East, 5364 Wilshire Blvd., Los Angeles, CA 90036

This is a Moth-style storytelling event, featuring writers, artists and community members. The second-annual event addresses the theme of “home.” Produced by NewGround and co-sponsored by eleven organizations, including Shulamit Gallery. The evening will also feature a performance art piece by Shulamit Gallery artist Marjan Vayghan.

Tickets available online

 

 

 

 

“Marjan Vayghan reacted, and her words, which closed the forum, reflected the conflictedness that had coursed through the whole discussion. She thanked Deitch for even attending, acknowledged how difficult his job must be and that she had found her participation in Abramovic’s performance powerful. But why was it the female body that was still always subject to display? Why were we stuck in these old molds of acceptability and unacceptability? And was it really true that the guests, who had democratized by donning the lab coats, couldn’t have pushed themselves just a little bit further and accepted another kind of democratization, too?”

Otis Alumni in Group Show at Durden and Ray

2:47 pm in 2000sCuratorialExhibitionsFine ArtsGraduate Fine Arts by Shefali Mistry

Tags: ARTRA CuratorialCathy AkersClaudia ParducciDurden and RayEd GomezLA MartLouisa Van LeerLuis G. HernandezMarjan VayghanMolly CoreyNicholas KersulisSergio Torres-Torres

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Durden and Ray presents: Fellow Travelers
June 2 – June 23, 2012

Fellow Travelers looks at historically significant citizen activism, from Vietnam War opposition to more recent movements in the US, Central America and Iran, with a focus on the outsider perspective. The afternoon-to-evening event will include a screening of Swedish documentary The Black Power Mixtape 1967-1975, a conversation with Mary Corey, participant in and historian of ’60s counter-culture, and an exhibition of contemporary artists Cathy Akers, Molly Corey (’01 MFA Fine Arts), Nick Kersulis, Ed Gomez (’03 MFA Fine Arts), Sergio Torres-Torres, and Marjan Vayghan (’06 Fine Arts), whose work on historical activism implicates the contemporary observer of history in the making.

Curated by Luis G. Hernandez (’03 MFA Fine Arts), Claudia Parducci and Louisa Van Leer for ARTRA Curatorial

For more information, visit: http://durdenandray.com/Exhibitions

 

 

http://artweek.la/issue/november-12-2012/article/simply-perfect-art-project

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Vol. 101 November 12, 2012 – Print the November 12, 2012 Issue

November 12, 2012Features

Simply Perfect Art Project

 

 

Mon, Nov 21, 2011

 

Here’s a new kind of window shopping for the holiday season featuring local emerging talent, sponsored by Patrón Spirits and benefiting the Los Angeles Art Association.

 

Now through December 31, 2011, the Patrón “Simply Perfect” Art Project will showcase live, working art studios and galleries that offer emerging artists the opportunity to create one-of-a-kind works of art for auction in support of local organizations.

 

Across the country, four “Simply Perfect” Art Project studios occupy formerly vacant storefront windows that have been transformed into spaces of creativity and imagination for nearly 30 up-and-coming artists. Given approximately one week each, artists will create an original painting, sculpture or other work based on their personal interpretation of Patrón tequila’s “Simply Perfect” mantra.

 

Each studio is active throughout afternoons and evenings, Wednesdays through Sundays. During all other times, the art will be on display in each window, along with a video screen showing the progression of the collective work. To view the art in Los Angeles visit the “Simply Perfect” Art Project location at 7024 Hollywood Blvd., Los Angeles (between North Sycamore Avenue & North Orange Drive).

 

“These live art studios offer a unique opportunity for emerging artists to showcase their work to a much larger audience. At the same time, we hope to enhance the holiday season by bringing people the experience of artistic creation,” said Jennifer Long of Patrón. “We are thrilled to promote fresh talent and, with their help, enrich the local community. Their generosity of time and talent is a simply perfect gift to their cities, and we’re proud to amplify it.”

 

The artist whose work receives the highest bid will receive national exposure in a print advertisement for Patrón in 2012. Additionally, the proceeds from the purchased pieces will benefit the Los Angeles Art Association.

 

Artist Schedules

 

Dan Monteavaro: November 15-21

 

Kelly Berg and Hung Viet Nguyen: November 22-28

 

Ryan McCann: November 29-December 5

 

Tommy Hollenstein: December 6-12

 

Shizuko Greenblatt and Katherine Rohrbacher: December 13-19

 

YaYa Chou: December 20-26

 

Marjan Vayghan: December 27-31

 

 

 

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http://www.laweekly.com/2011-12-29/art-books/hotel-art-L.A./

 

 

 

 

Art+Books

Hotel Art in L.A.: A User’s Guide

By Shana Nys Dambrot Thursday, Dec 29 2011

 

The days of gilt-framed faux-impressionism punctuating hotel walls are over. Or it certainly seems that way, as just about every trendy boutique hotel is making concerted efforts to bring the work of living artists into the fold, as lobbies and bars are transformed into legitimate galleries.

This is mostly good news, since it means artists are getting work, and exposure to a whole segment of

culturally aware spenders and tastemakers, while savvy travelers are getting better things to look at. But recent unfortunate events at the Ritz-Carlton Residences at L.A. Live, in which the commissioned work of two popular street artists was callously destroyed, raise the question: Just what are these lifestyle purveyors hoping to accomplish by putting all this legitimate art on the walls? And what, if anything, is the real effect of this trend on the art world?

It’s hard to see a downside for the artists or the galleries that sell the work to the hotel curators and designers — a sale is a sale. As the profile and quality of the hotel-art genre improve, no harm is done to their résumés, either. Some of the best efforts are even attracting positive critical attention. The more glittery segments of the mainstream gallery scene are the same demographic that the hippest boutique hotels are hoping to attract.

Furthermore, in hotels, as in the gallery world, there’s an aesthetic divide between street art, which is or draws inspiration from the sometimes illegal practice of painting outdoor murals, and fine art fare, which is sometimes edgy but definitely better behaved. As befits a culture capital, in L.A.’s hotels, there’s plenty of everything to go around.

Here’s a guide to some of the best art-friendly hotels in the city.

Andaz West Hollywood

One of the best-conceived and most dynamic programs is “Art Seen” at West Hollywood’s Andaz Hotel. Curated by charming, respected art and design consultant Merry Norris, the Andaz is festooned with long-term installations, commissions and even purchases, which are integrated throughout the public spaces to great effect. With a decisive focus on the work of contemporary, midcareer local artists, the art situation at the former Riot House is the most casually professional and also most whimsical of the trend. On display right now are sculptures by Jaime Scholnick, paintings by Dion Johnson, sculptures by Elizabeth Higgins O’Connorand a stunning painting by Kristin Everberg listed as being from the Andaz’s permanent collection. It’s so grand and old-school for a hotel to have a permanent collection; good on them. 8401 Sunset Blvd., W. Hlywd.

BLVD Hotel & Spa

The BLVD Hotel & Spa in Universal City owns much of the art it shows, too — but for a very different reason. It has a program called BLVD Arts, which in September, in conjunction with 1881 Project, held a high-profile mural competition and graffiti wall smackdown. After a raucous live event, a Web-based voting process ensued, and Gino Gaspara‘s mural — a raw and witty mash-up of Hollywood and pop art icons with the real people who live there — won and will grace the BLVD’s exterior. By freely offering outdoor and indoor spaces of the hotel as blank canvases for artists, it’s proved itself to be welcoming of the street-art aesthetic and the crowds that love it. 10730 Ventura Blvd., Studio City.

The Ritz-Carlton, Los Angeles

Compare the scene at BLVD to the scandal unfolding right now at the Ritz-Carlton Residences at L.A. Live, its condo section adjacent to the hotel. As of January 2011, the hotel was getting legitimate art-world kudos for its risky support of street artists, muralists and the shabby-chic but well-heeled ruffians who love them. Shepard Fairey deejayed a party there during the FADA Art Fair, and L.A. Art Machine was tapped to organize an extensive art show, including a now-infamously destroyed (or cleaned up in a clueless but not malicious accident, depending on who you ask) mural installation by Shark Toof, Mear One and Chor Boogie. An official lawsuit on behalf of the artists valuing the destroyed work at between $100,000 and $150,000 was filed recently, although it won’t bring back the work — or the goodwill. Project curator Bryson Strauss of L.A. Art Machine said in a statement, “We knew Ritz-Carlton had commercial interests, but we took their excitement about this artwork, the artists and the event as genuine. The loss of 90 feet of murals by world-class artists is a tragedy. I can’t get my head around the indifference.” 900 W. Olympic Blvd., dwntwn.

W Hotel

The sparkly, newish W Hotel on Hollywood Boulevard is a confection of sumptuous and smart design, with visual art of unusually high quality integrated fully into its look of futuristic retro glam. And like the Ritz, it has pricey, tricked-out condos for sale at its adjoining residences. Also, as with the Ritz, the art-centric lifestyle branding is intensive. But that’s where the similarities end. The irony of showing Robert Longo‘s iconic late-’80s silhouette paintings Falling Businessmen in the lobby possibly is lost on the hotel administration and its guests, but either way, it’s a striking choice that anyone who cared about New York art in the swinging good old days will appreciate. For a real estate showcase event, the hotel decorated its model suite with a series of paintings by a well-known local artist, Michael Salerno, along with renewable and reclaimed design pieces. The artists and their friends were invited to the very civilized afternoon party, which also doubled as a benefit for a local arts organization that Salerno supports. That’s how you do it, Ritz. 6250 Hollywood Blvd., Hlywd.

The Standard

The Standard Hotels, in both Hollywood and downtown, arguably are better at this art thing than anyone. From day one, the Standard has woven contemporary art into the very fabric of its stellar brand, partly in a successful bid for the attention of the coveted artsy demographic and partly because the people who work there have a true affinity for progressive culture. They are frequently happy to produce or allow art shows, happenings, book parties, public forums and performances — recent highlights include projects by Sylvia Ji,Miranda July and Ryan McGinness — and every month the exterior wall on the Sixth Street façade of the downtown branch hosts a new mural. The company’s website is itself a kind of cultural hub featuring news, blogs, online art projects, info on local events and the like,  going well beyond visual art to feature literature, music, film, design and fashion, but it’s the embrace of visual art as its central draw that has made the Standards what they are. 550 S. Flower St., dwntwn.; 8300 Sunset Blvd., W. Hlywd.

Sunset Marquis

Maximillian Gallery at the Sunset Marquis updates the hotel art shop in dramatic fashion. Its location in a posh West Hollywood hotel makes its focus on street art an unlikely choice, but it works, and the gallery has a strong program and a bright future even when compared with more serious, nonhotel galleries. 1200 Alta Loma Road, W. Hlywd.

Mondrian

Down the street, the Mondrian has been sort of following suit, inviting this past summer the Artspace online art gallery to open a pop-up store that offered access to works by A-list gallery stars such as Kara WalkerRoss Bleckner and Kenny Scharf. The Mondrian also worked with Culver City kunsthalle LAXART to present its own pop-up, featuring graphics–inspired painterBobbi Woods. This past summer, Nicole Cohen‘s fashion- and furniture-inspired video art installation kicked off with a performance night organized by See Line Gallery, which was beloved by cocktail culturati and art people alike. 8440 Sunset Blvd., W. Hlywd.

The Hollywood Roosevelt

And finally, speaking of the dream team of art, hotels and cocktails: Patrón tequila’s new Simply Perfect Art Project invited artists to create one-of-a-kind works for auction in support of local organizations, occupying vacant but well-located storefront windows. In this case, while technically not a program of the Roosevelt Hotel, Simply Perfect is happening right now in its boulevard-facing windows. The L.A. edition benefits Los Angeles Art Association/Gallery 825, where all the artists doing the project are members. Throughout December it hosted mixed-media painter and sculptor Shizuko Greenblatt; painter Katherine Rohrbacher; sculptural installation artist YaYa Chou; and sculptor-photographer-performance artist Marjan Vayghan, who will be present evenings through Dec. 31. 7000 Hollywood Blvd., Hlywd.

 

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Patron – “Simply Perfect” Art Project<br /><br /> http://pearlmediaus.com/blog/?p=224<br /><br /> Posted on November 18, 2011 by admin<br /><br /> Patron Sponsors Live Studios, Auctions For The Arts<br /><br /> Thursday, November 17th, 3:32 PM<br /><br /> Between Nov. 15 and Dec. 31, the Patron Spirits Company is sponsoring live, working art studios and galleries where emerging artists will create works that will then be auctioned in support of four art organizations.<br /><br /> The “Simply Perfect Art Project” will also identify an artist whose work will be featured in a 2012 Patrón print ad.<br /><br /> The project is organized around four studios/storefront windows in formerly vacant spaces in Chicago, Los Angeles, New York and San Francisco. For a week, up to 30 artists will work in each studio to create original paintings, sculptures or other art based on their personal interpretations of Patron tequila’s “Simply Perfect” brand tag.<br /><br /> Visitors can watch the live work in progress at any of the four studios during afternoons and evenings, Wednesdays through Sundays. At other times, the art will be on display in each window, along with a video screen showing the progression of the collective work.<br /><br /> To view complete collections from all four cities, passers-by can scan the QR code located on the windows of each of the studios. The QR code links them to the auction site (eliminateregifting.com), where they will be able to learn more about the artists and bid on works of art.<br /><br /> Proceeds from purchased pieces will benefit local art organizations that are partners on the project, including the Chicago Artists’ Coalition, the Los Angeles Art Association, the New York Foundation for the Arts, and The Artists Guild of San Francisco.<br /><br /> The artist whose work receives the highest bid will be featured in the 2012 Patron ad.<br /><br /> The Richards Group and Pearl Media launched the project for Patrón. — Karlene Lukovitz<br /><br /> This article was posted by:<br /><br /> MediaPost<br /><br /> Windowscapes Become Working Art Studios and Galleries for the Holidays<br /><br /> 15 November 2011 21 h 39 min<br /><br /> Pearl Media has partnered with Patron and The Richards Group to launch the Patron “Simply Perfect” Art Project.The campaign features live, working art studios—all within storefront windows—that offer emerging artists the opportunity to create works of art for auction in support of four art organizations across the country. Using digital media and QR codes, consumers will be driven to an auction website (eliminateregifting.com) with proceeds from each sale benefiting the art organizations. The artwork that sells for the highest price will be featured in a Patron print ad in 2012.<br /><br /> Pearl Media was responsible for the complete execution of the campaign, which runs today through Dec. 31, 2011.<br /><br /> Each studio is active throughout afternoons and evenings, Wednesdays through Sundays. During all other times, the art will be on display in each window, along with a video screen showing the progression of the collective work. To view the art in the making, you can visit one of these four “Simply Perfect” Art Project locations:<br /><br /> · Chicago – 50 East Chicago Avenue (between North Wabash Avenue & North Rush Street)<br /><br /> · Los Angeles – 7024 Hollywood Blvd. (between North Sycamore Avenue & North Orange Drive)<br /><br /> · New York City – 454 West Broadway (between Prince Street & West Houston Street)<br /><br /> · San Francisco – 581 Market Street (between 1st Street & 2nd Street)<br /><br /> This article was written by:<br /><br /> OOH-tv<br /><br /> The proceeds from the purchased pieces will benefit local art organizations that are partners on the project, including:<br /><br /> Chicago Artists’ Coalition (chicagoartistscoalition.org)
Los Angeles Art Association (laaa.org)
New York Foundation for the Arts (nyfa.org)
The Artists Guild of San Francisco (artistsguildsf.com)<br /><br /> The first round of artwork will be posted for bidding on Monday, November 21. Please visit http://www.eliminateregifting.com/ often over the next seven weeks as there will be over 30 pieces of unique artwork to bid on.<br /><br /> ..........................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................<br /><br /> ===================================================================== .........................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................<br /><br /> http://www.vanwagner.com/case-study-library/case-studies/?study_id=40:<br /><br /> Van Wagner   Case Study Library   The Richards Group/The Patrón Spirits Company - "Simply Perfect" > The Richards Group/The Patrón Spirits Company - "Simply Perfect"<br /><br />  </p><br /> <p></p><br /> <p>   </p><br /> <p><br /><br /> Hollywood, CA<br /><br />  The Richards Group/The Patrón Spirits Company<br /><br /> "Simply Perfect"<br /><br /> Situation
Patrón, the top-selling ultra-premium tequila in the world had its own cadre of premium tequila enthusiasts who look to the brand for lifestyle cues. They wanted to reinforce their iconic positioning, build upon their "Simply Perfect" campaign and continue to foster their special relationship with their core consumers and involvement with local communities.<br /><br /> Solution
To reach their target audience of active, involved, informed, trendsetting, tequila aficianados, Patrón and their agency The Richards Group, worked with Van Wagner to showcase the brand on a new spectacular on an iconic landmark at one of most famous intersections in the world: Hollywood and Vine. The Patrón Spirits Company hand-picked Van Wagner's display to showcase their association and their support of the Hollywood revitalization effort. Patrón's neon sign now appears on the roof of the former Equitable Building at the northeast corner of Hollywood Boulevard and Vine Street.<br /><br /> The Patrón sign, just down the block from the historic Capitol Records building is Hollywood's first adaptive re-use residential project. The development is expected to be occupied in 2009 and will include a W Hotel, luxury condos, retail space and a transit plaza. According to Ed Brown, president and CEO of The Patrón Spirits Company, "When Patrón was first introduced in 1989, it was people in Los Angeles and members of the Hollywood community who first embraced this brand, before there was even such a thing as ultrapremium tequila. We haven't forgotten the role that this community has played in our success, and we're proud to bring Patrón to Hollywood once again, with support and investment on this historic revitalized corner of Hollywood and Vine, and on this beautifully redesigned new residential building."<br /><br /> Patrón customized the message for the location. Built upon their "Simply Perfect" campaign, the message is premised on the concept of debating perfection. The campaign states that all forms of perfection are open to discussion, except when it comes to tequila; then there is simply no debate - Patron unquestionably is the best. In this case, the featured question is who is more "perfect" in Hollywood, a "Rock Star" or a "Movie Star." The neon spectacular alternately flashes this choice, over the words "Some Perfection is Debatable," then shifts to an image of a Patron tequila bottle, with the words "Some is Not." Excitement was built up around the launch. Gene Simmons ceremoniously lit the display at the high profile, celebrity-filled launch party.<br /><br /> Results
The display hit a home run. It is consistent with Patron's brand strategy and is sure to become an indelible part of the Hollywood landscape. The display carries through the Simply Perfect campaign by bringing entertaining debatable concepts about hotly contested -- and often humorous -- topical issues to life. It provides an opportunity to engage viewers and show the brand's support and involvement with the community. Leron Gubler, president and CEO of the Hollywood Chamber of Commerce summed it up stating "Not only did The Patrón Spirits Company choose to invest in our community, they also created an exciting and entertaining sign that is attention-grabbing and relevant to Hollywood". The tremendous excitement around both the brand and the display received numerous press mentions and publicity. The neon silhouette of the Patrón bottle is fast becoming relevant iconic image making a lasting impression among a new generation of sophisticated trend-setters. It's leading the way to update an area that previously was well known for its concentration of radio and movie related businesses, the glamour era of Hollywood (1920's) and the Hollywood Walk of Fame.<br /><br /> ..........................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................<br /><br /> ===================================================================== .........................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................<br /><br /> http://pearlmediaus.com/blog/?p=243<br /><br /> Patron “Simply Perfect” Art Project – Eliminate Regifting<br /><br /> Posted on January 10, 2012 by admin<br /><br /> Non-traditional media company Pearl Media LLC, Fairfield, New Jersey, has partnered with The Patron Spirits Company, and The Richards Group, Dallas, to launch the Patrón ‘Simply Perfect’ Art Project to raise money for charitable organizations and identify an artist whose work will be featured in a 2012 Patron print ad.<br /><br /> Patron tequila is an ultra-premium luxury white spirit sourced, before distillation, from the highest-quality Weber Blue agave plants grown in the highlands of Jalisco, Mexico.<br /><br /> The campaign features live, working art studios – all within storefront windows – that offer emerging artists the opportunity to create works of art for auction in support of four art organizations across the country. The ’Simply Perfect’ Art Project studios occupy formerly vacant storefront windows that have been transformed into spaces of creativity and imagination for nearly 30 up-and-coming artists. Given approximately one week each, artists will create an original painting, sculpture or other work based on their personal interpretation of Patron tequila’s ‘Simply Perfect’ mantra.<br /><br /> Each studio is active throughout afternoons and evenings, Wednesdays through Sundays. During all other times, the art will be on display in each window, along with a video screen showing the progression of the collective work.
The four locations are in;<br /><br /> Chicago – 50 East Chicago Avenue (between North Wabash Ave. & North Rush St.);<br /><br /> Los Angeles – 7024 Hollywood Blvd. (between North Sycamore Ave. & North Orange Drive);<br /><br /> New York City – 454 West Broadway (between Prince & West Houston Streets);<br /><br /> San Francisco – 581 Market Street (between 1st & 2nd Streets).<br /><br /> <br /><br /> Patron’s Los Angeles Art Studio<br /><br /> “These live art studios offer a unique opportunity for emerging artists to showcase their work to a much larger audience,” says Jennifer Long, Patron brand director. “At the same time, we hope to enhance the holiday season by bringing people the experience of artistic creation. We are thrilled to promote fresh talent and, with their help, enrich the local community. Their generosity of time and talent is a simply perfect gift to their cities, and we’re proud to amplify it.”<br /><br /> To view complete collections from all four cities, passers-by can scan the QR code located on the windows of each of the four installations. The QR code links consumers directly to the auction website, where they will be able to learn more about the artists and bid on their favorite works of art.<br /><br /> The artist whose work receives the highest bid will receive national exposure in a print advertisement for Patron in 2012. Additionally, the proceeds from the purchased pieces will benefit local art organizations that are partners on the project, including: the Chicago Artists’ Coalition; Los Angeles Art Association; New York Foundation for the Arts; and The Artists Guild of San Francisco.<br /><br /> Pearl Media was responsible for the complete execution of the campaign, including the working storefront art studios and all digital elements.<br /><br /> Launched Nov. 14/11, the campaign runs through Dec. 31/11.<br /><br /> This Article was written by:<br /><br /> Gail Chiasson, North American Editor Daily DOOH<br /><br /> ..........................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................<br /><br /> ===================================================================== .........................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................<br /><br /> http://www.mediapost.com/publications/article/170929/best-branding-campaign-pearl-media-patron-simply.html#axzz2E2vOTn1d</p><br /> <p>Best Branding Campaign: Pearl Media, Patron Simply Perfect Live Artist Studios, Patron<br /><br /> Mar 23, 2012, 2:18 PM<br /><br /> Pearl Media, Patrón Tequila and The Richards Group created a live artist experience -- "Simply Perfect" -- where about 30 up-and-coming artists created original artwork inspired by their personal interpretation with Patrón in New York's Soho; Hollywood; Chicago's Gold Coast; and San Francisco's Union Square. Each location, wrapped in branded vinyl, featured a live artist studio visible to street pedestrians, complete with digital display in one window that ran looped content of artists hard at work. QR Codes were integrated to drive traffic to the online auction site where consumers could bid on the completed artwork. The artwork was auctioned from a branded Web site.</p><br /> <p>Read more: http://www.mediapost.com/publications/article/170929/best-branding-campaign-pearl-media-patron-simply.html#ixzz2E2vU1gwq</p><br /> <p>http://artweek.la/issue/november-21-2011/article/simply-perfect-art-project<br /><br /> </p><br /> <p></p><br /> <p>Marjan Vayghan<br /><br /> Location: Iran<br /><br /> Born to Azerbaijani parents in Tehran, Iran in 1984, Marjan Vayghan emigrated to the United States in the Spring of 1995, settling with her family in Los Angeles, California. Marjan continues to live alternately between Teheran and Los Angeles. Her practice is informed by this context of movement and flexible citizenship across both geographical and cultural spaces, and the multiple realities these spaces engender.<br /><br /> www.MarjanVayghan.com</p><br /> <p>Portfolio: </p><br /> <p>

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